Gardening

Gerani


Hollyhock Geraniums


Favorite plants in Italy, but also in the rest of Europe, to beautify balconies and terraces during spring and summer. The flowering is very rich, the simple cultivation, the care to be lent not excessive: insomme perfect plants for the beginners and also for the experts.
For many years the passion for geraniums, or rather for the pelargonium (и pelargonium the botanical name, geraniacee is the name of the family), has led the producers of plants to enrich the genus with numerous hybrids; double flower, colored leaf, with fragrant leaf. On the market it is possible to find most of the botanical species, originating from Africa, and the many hybrids.
To get to know these plants better, to know how to cultivate them and also, for those who want, to begin a real collection, we turned to a true expert in the sector, Filippo Figuera, owner of the Malvarosa nursery, one of the professionals in the sector, who for years he deals eslcusivamente with geraniums, pardon, pelargonium.
Our expert has dedicated a little of his free time to telling us how pelargoniums are cultivated, and how a nurseryman keen on geraniums lives.

Pelargonium CrispumGeraniaceae



Generalities: evergreen, aromatic that is not used in the kitchen but for its fragrance.
The leaves: light green, small and crinkled, they grow thick and dense on short stems along the entire length of the branches, they are bordered by cream-colored margins. If broken they give off a lemon aroma and for this reason they can be used in mixtures of aromatic dried flowers. The plant, if placed in a place of passage both in the apartment and in the garden, gives off its characteristic perfume, if touched.
The flowers: small mauve-colored, they appear in spring.
Soil: a soil composed mainly of organic matter is used.
Fertilizations: they must be carried out every 7-10 days during the growing period, with fertilizer for indoor plants.
Multiplication: multiplies in the summer by cutting.
Watering: wet regularly from the bottom, let the surface of the soil dry completely before watering again. Avoid wetting the leaves.
Exposure: In full sun and plenty of light.
Temperature: in summer up to 21 degrees, in autumn transfer the plant into the house at a temperature of 10-13 ° C
Pests and diseases: white fly, which can be eradicated with an insecticide or biologically with the Formar Encarsia. Viruses can be carried by aphids and other insects.



























AROMATIS Sweet Mimosa
Photo owned by Lazzeri Agricoltural
Group

Flower:
pink, simple, big
Leaf:
normal green, variegated, medium-large
Growth:
medium strong
Features:
aromatic scent


AROMATIS Lady Plymounth
Photo owned by Lazzeri Agricoltural
Group
Flower:
without flower
Leaf:
silver and yellow green, strongly toothed, medium-large
Growth:
strong, upright
Features:
mint fragrance


AROMATIS Pelargonium fragrans
Photo owned by Lazzeri Agricoltural
Group
Flower:
white, simple, small, very generous in flowering
Leaf:
silver green, small
Growth:
medium-strong, semi-erect, excellent branching from
don't tick
Features:
scent of lavender, attracts bees


AROMATIS Atomic Snowflake
Photo owned by Lazzeri Agricoltural
Group
Flower:
lilac, simple, medium-silvered
Leaf:
silver green with yellow, medium-large edge
Growth:
strong semi-erect, no need to tick
Features:
lemon scent


AROMATIS Pink Capitatum
Photo owned by Lazzeri Agricoltural
Group
Flower:
deep pink, simple, large
Leaf:
silvered green, strongly toothed, large
Growth:
strong, semi-erect
Features:
lemon scent


AROMATIS Concolor Lace
Photo owned by Lazzeri Agricoltural
Group
Flower:
from red to deep pink, simple, small
Leaf:
normal green, strongly toothed, small
Growth:
medium-strong, erect, it is not necessary to tick
Features:
walnut scent

Pelargonium with fragrant leafby Filippo Figuera (Vivaio Malvarosa)



One of the fun aspects of my work as a nursery-collector is the opportunity to meet unusual and sometimes bizarre characters, but also normal people who tell me strange stories or who ask me questions and questions to which I honestly cannot answer. In particular, during the market exhibitions around Italy, there is the opportunity to make these meetings. A lady long ago asked me if it was true that milk is good for pelargoniums. In fact I don't have any experience in this regard but I suppose that in non excessive doses, it shouldn't hurt! I only wonder if the best method of administration is root or foliar. I imagine the cat of my curious client intent on cleaning up the saucers of their delicious contents.
Many questions do not concern the treatment we have to reserve for our pelargoniums but the usefulness we can derive from their cultivation. In fact, in recent years the interest in “ancient recipes” has become more and more widespread, as have the traditional and “natural” techniques that included the use, in all the houses, of herbs and products from the countryside. In many cases, only the ornamental value of the plants is no longer considered in imagining and designing their own green corner, but great importance is given to the possibility of inserting plants that can perform multiple functions: furnish, spread a pleasant smell in the environment, season the most original dishes, chase away unwanted insects, etc.

Mosquitoes and pelargoniums



One of the most frequent questions concerns the repellent power of the leaf-like pelargoniums against mosquitoes. Usually I turn this question over to anyone who asked me and I almost always hear that despite the presence of odorous pelargoniums around the house, mosquitoes come anyway. In fact, I too have the same experience. In fact, not only do mosquitoes come into the house but they happily park in the nursery area where I keep the odorous pelargoniums.
But then why are candles, sprays, ointments perfumed with the essence of pelargonium used? Is it a scam? Maybe a scam that is based on the "natural recipe" fashion? In fact it is not so, it is not a scam! From the pelargoniums (in particular from P. graveolens and from the horticultural varieties of this) an essential oil is extracted, the geraniol, which is used in the perfume industry and in the production of insect repellent substances. The effect that one or more plants placed next to the door of the house (which spread their smell to a gust of wind or to rubbing of clothes) can give cannot be comparable to that of a candle that emanates a mix of precise smells and definitely effective. So if we want to keep mosquitoes away without using insecticides and chemicals, we can also use geraniol-based products, but don't expect much help from our terrace's pelargoniums.
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