Category Flowers

Chrysanthemum alpinum
Flowers

Chrysanthemum alpinum

Chrysanthemum alpinum: COMPOSITAE CHRYSANTHEMUM ALPINUM L. Alpine chamomile 5-15 cm tall plant. Pennatifid leaves. Large flower heads. External white ligular flowers, yellow tubular interiors, involucral bracts with blackish brown margin. Flower. : VII - VIII. It grows in the stony pastures, calciocarenti (1400 - 3000 meters).

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Flowers

Genista lydia

Genista lydia: The brooms were very welcome to the Greeks and Romans who cultivated them in abundance to attract bees and thus obtain an excellent honey. In Spain, they were much appreciated for their delicate scent and also the fiber of the roots was used to produce rope for ships.
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Flowers

Chamomile

Chamomile: Chamomile was considered by the gardeners of the past to be able to "heal" other suffering and weaker plants; it was enough for his bushes to be placed near the shrubs and sick trees to see satisfactory results after a short time. The meaning of strength in adversity is attributed to the chamomile flower, probably due to the known relaxing properties of infusions based on its flowers.
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Flowers

Carrot

Carrot: This plant grows spontaneously in meadows throughout Europe, reviving them especially during late spring when the flowers of the Wild Carrot become even invasive. There are numerous properties associated with the plant and range from efficacy against "love problems" (aphrodisiac power) to the remedy for nerve diseases.
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Flowers

Honeysuckle

Honeysuckle: The name Honeysuckle derives from the Latin caprifolium and refers to the predisposition of this plant to climb all that is in its immediate vicinity and that recalls, for this reason, the ability to climb of goats. Also famous is the sweetness of the nectar of this flower, from which derives the meaning attributed to the plant and that is sweetness of soul.
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Flowers

Cimina

Cimina: The Cimina Grass is a variety of wild geranium, also known as "flower crane" due to the characteristic shape of the inflorescences. Also noteworthy is the unpleasant smell of its flowers. The meaning of the Cimina Grass is, however, to be traced back to the predilection and love with which the members of the Cistercian order used to treat and care for the plant; hence the value of the Cimina Grass, that is absolute and tireless devotion, one of the main Cistercian beliefs.
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Flowers

Cedar

Cedar: Cedar Originates from Asia; in Europe it came thanks to the Arabs. It was represented in Greek-Roman frescoes and mosaics; Pliny the Elder knew him and mentioned him in his treatises and collections. Even Ludovico Ariosto, in the Orlando Furioso, describes the fruits and flowers and the majesty of the plant.
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Flowers

Snowdrop

Snowdrop: It is called "morning star" because it is one of the first flowers to spring from the ground after winter. The Christian tradition associates the snowdrop with candelora, on February 2nd, the day of the purification of the Madonna. Furthermore, a legend tells that Eve and Adam, once driven out of the Earthly Paradise, were transported to a cold, dark place where it was always winter.
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Flowers

Arbutus

Strawberry Tree: Strawberry Tree Also called marine ceraso or albatross. The botanical name, Arbutus unedo (= I eat only one), was assigned to him by Pliny the Elder, making a clear allusion to the scantiness of its fruits. In Algeria and in Corsica from the fruits the wine called "of corbezzolo" is obtained.
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Flowers

Clematis

Clematis: In the eighteenth century and in the Victorian Age the clematis was planted by the English in their gardens, as its colorful and abundant flowers were considered well-wishing for the inhabitants of the house and for all the guests who came to the same. On the basis of this value even in the English countryside locks of clematis were used to surround the fields in order to obtain a good harvest.
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Flowers

Cyclamen

In the third century Theophrastus wrote that cyclamen was used to excite love and sensuality. The name derives from the Greek kuklos which means circle and, for this reason, some scholars, associating the shape of the flower and the etymological term with the female uterus, believed that the plant was able to facilitate conception.
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Flowers

Crown

Crown: The Imperial Crown is originally from Turkey. Precisely for this reason in Italy it has been known since ancient times as an oriental lily. Despite not being particularly fragrant, the fame enjoyed by the Imperial Crown in the field of flowers is of absolute importance. The elegance of the posture, as well as the height that the plant can reach, make the Imperial Crown dominate over all the other flowers.
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Flowers

Crocus

Crocus: Already known in the times of the Greeks, it is a widespread flower throughout the Mediterranean basin, from Asia Minor to Northern Africa. Its name derives from the Greek kroke, which means filament, just to represent the long stigmas that characterize its flower. Homer describes the nuptial thalamus of Jupiter and Juno covered with so many flowers including the crocus.
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Flowers

Linaria - Linaria maroccana

Linaria: Linaria is commonly known as toad because of the shape of its flowers. Another association that has always referred to linaria is inherent to linen (the term linaria in fact dates back to the Latin linum); its leaves seem to trace the texture of the fabric, especially before flowering.
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Flowers

Convolvolus - Convolvolus cneorum

When talking about Convolvulus all gardeners tremble, one of the most resistant weeds. The bindweed is not only just an infestation, it is a splendid flower that gives abundant blooms, there are numerous varieties and its meaning fully represents the plant. The term Convolvulus, also called Villucchio, derives from the Latin Convolvulus, which means to wrap, and means the tendency of the plant to twist.
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Flowers

Heather

Erica: Plant widespread in Europe, even as a wild plant, it is cultivated in the garden, but is increasingly used also in outdoor compositions or in bunches of flowers, especially dried ones; the small spikes of colorful bellflowers, very persistent, and the linear leaves, of a very bright color, make it very suitable also for making centerpieces or decorations and garlands.
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Flowers

Dahlia

Dalia: The dahlia is native to Mexico, from where it was transferred to Europe with great difficulties, mainly due to the very long journey that the bulbs had to face. Perhaps the first seeds were imported by a Swedish botanist. The poet Gothe was a great admirer of this flower, of which he has, on several occasions, praised beauty.
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Flowers

Epilobio

Epilobio: The term Epilobio derives from the Greek words epi = above and lobos = pod, just to signify the particular position of the Epilobium flower, which actually grows on the seed pod. To this peculiarity of the plant is also linked the symbolic value to the same associated, or that of challenge; the practically "unreal" position of the flower has in fact been interpreted as a completely arduous undertaking, hardly comparable to any other.
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Flowers

Fritillaria

Fritillaria: The Fritillaria Tenella is a flower particularly dear to the French folk tradition. In the 1600s, in fact, the fashion of the times represented and adorned clothes with this flower. To underline the absolutely unique coloring of its petals; they are in fact speckled with black and white squares.
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Flowers

Wild thistle

Cardo sylvester: Scientifically known by the Greek term dipsao (= to have thirst). This name is due to the concave shape of the leaves of the plant, which after the rains contain a fair amount of water. The Celtic tradition describes, in fact, elves and gnomes who drink using the leaves of the cardoon thistle as cups.
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Flowers

Euphorbia

Euphorbia: This plant belongs to the genus euphorbia, and is native to Mexico; in fact the custom of giving them at Christmas comes from America. A Mexican legend wants it as a plant donated by a poor man to the Child of Jesus; still today it is used as a symbol of Christmas, as a good omen for the months to come, given the bright and joyful colors that remind us of spring, a period of sowing and harvest.
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